Save money on seasonal allergy medications

seasonal allergy medicationsAnother post related to seasonal allergies, because 2017 is apparently going to be a nasty spring for allergy sufferers! Like me.  đŸ˜„

As I said in my last post, I prefer to use a neti pot over taking medication (and it works great for me!), but I know a neti pot won’t be everyone’s cup of tea.

Over-the-counter allergy medications can be expensive, though, even the generics. Know what you need before you buy. Then shop for the best price. I always recommend buying the store brand.

Here is some information about the various types of drugs marketed to … Continue reading

Neti pot for spring allergies

spring allerigesSeattle has had an unseasonably cold and wet spring (even for us!), but that hasn’t stopped my seasonal allergies from arriving on cue.

Time to rinse off my neti pot.

When the pollen counts are high, I use my neti pot every day and it really, really helps.

I prefer using a neti pot rather than antihistamines to treat spring allergies for a couple of reasons.

One, it’s inexpensive. Over-the-counter allergy meds are anything but! Even the generics are pricey.

Two, there are no side effects. I don’t like how antihistamines or decongestants make me feel, and I definitely don’t … Continue reading

An EpiShell for your EpiPen

The EpiShell will protect your investment

I recently saw a news story about a local family that came up with a brilliant invention—the EpiShell.

What is the EpiShell? It’s a small insulated tube that provides climate control for your EpiPens.

epishell

Why is this a great idea? Like most medications, epinephrine is best kept at room temperature. Temperature extremes speed up deterioration of the product.

Anyone who needs an EpiPen is counseled to carry it with them at all times. If a child has a life-threatening allergy, that means having multiple EpiPens for school, daycare, a backpack, the family car, … Continue reading

Outrageous cost of EpiPens finally getting some attention

Wow. Talk about timing.

I just posted a few weeks ago about my dread of renewing my EpiPen prescription because of its cost—over $700 without insurance, and still over $600 with my insurance!

It seems other healthcare advocates, the media, Congress and even the presidential nominees are at last realizing how insane it is to charge that much for literally a few cents worth of epinephrine.

EpiPens are not even new to the market, like so many other high-priced drugs. It’s been around for a long time, so Mylan pharmaceuticals can’t claim it’s trying to recoup R&D costs. In fact, … Continue reading

First aid for bee stings

yellow jacketHow do you react?

Bees, wasps, yellow jackets, hornets, and fire ants all belong to the same order of insects, Hymenoptera, so their venoms cause similar reactions if you are stung or bitten.

People’s bodies react in one of three ways:

  1. 85-90% experience a small local reaction—pain, redness and some swelling just around the sting site.
  2. 10% experience what is called a “large local reaction”—pain, itching, redness and swelling extending well beyond the sting site, 4 to 6 inches or more. (This is me! When I was stung in the hand last year, my entire arm swelled up.)
  3. 1-3%
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Why are EpiPens so expensive?

epipensEpiPens – lifesaving but costly

I’m allergic to bee stings, so I keep an EpiPen handy when I’m working out in my garden this time of year.

But my EpiPens are more than 3 years old now, and it’s time to invest in a new set.

Why do I say invest? Because EpiPens are incredibly expensive!

Related post: First aid for bee stings

I didn’t know that three years ago when I bought them. At that time, my health insurance did not include coverage for prescription medications (all ACA-compliant plans must now), so I paid the full price out of … Continue reading

Home remedies for allergy eyes

allergy eyesSpring and allergy eyes

I love the sunny days of early spring when the trees are in flower…but then my allergies kick in.

I don’t mind the runny nose and sneezing so much. I can use my neti pot to keep the pollen out of my nose.

But I’ve had a harder time treating the allergy eyes—the itchy, red, watery, ugly eyes that are the byproduct of all that seasonal pollen floating in the air.

Another name for allergy eyes is allergic conjunctivitis.

Try some simple treatments

I can’t avoid spring flowers, but I’ve finally (after many years of suffering) … Continue reading

Allergies 101 Infographic

I love infographics!

So when Blink Health invited me to share their infographic on allergies, Allergies 101, I was happy to agree.

Blink Health is one of several health care start-ups I’ve been watching that I think provide innovative ways to help people save money on health care. Blink Health specifically helps patients save money on prescription medications.

Blink Health is the first company to develop a proprietary technology to group millions of patients together, creating the strength to negotiate the lowest prescriptions prices possible. They are also the first company to allow patients to purchase their medications online

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Are you really allergic to penicillin?

When my son was about 10 years old he got an infected blister on his foot. I took him to the pediatrician to have the abscess drained, and then he was given a prescription for Augmentin, a fancy and expensive form of amoxicillin.

(If I knew then what I know now, of course, I would have 1) questioned whether an antibiotic was really necessary, and 2) wasn’t there a cheaper alternative to a brand name drug?)

Within 24 hours of taking the Augmentin, my son developed a terrible case of hives starting on his infected foot and eventually running up … Continue reading

Don’t self diagnose food allergies

When you go to the grocery store is your cart full of “free” foods, such as soy-free, dairy-free, egg-free, gluten-free, nut-free, peanut-free, etc.?

With so many of these products being heavily marketed, and poor health information being widely spread on the internet through Facebook, blogs and other social networking sites, it’s easy to make assumptions about food allergies for your and/or your children.

Common symptoms that everyone gets occasionally—nausea, diarrhea, acne, fatigue, weight gain, rashes, and sinusitis—are frequently misdiagnosed as food allergies or intolerances.

I have had many friends over the years who have told me they or one of … Continue reading

Kids and allergies

I’ve seen several recent news stories on kids and allergies.

For some time, it’s seemed to me that the incidence of childhood allergies, especially serious ones like peanut allergies, have been on the increase.

Food labels carry warnings about possible peanut contamination; schools ban snacks or sack lunches containing peanuts; some airlines have designated “peanut-free” zones. It’s crazy and disturbing. And do you know how much an Epi-Pen costs??

Aaron Carroll, MD, the pediatrician who blogs at The Incidental Economist had a good post on the subject: By shielding infants from stuff, we may be making allergies worse

Since 2000, … Continue reading

Humidity for sinus health

humidity for sinus healthI saw this Travel Humidifier on a pharmacist’s blog last week, and I’m thinking I might get one.

Normally, I don’t buy a lot of gadgets of any kind, but I’m kind of excited about this humidifier.

Why?

Just a few weeks ago, I arrived home from a plane trip and promptly came down with a cold that turned into a sinus infection.

I wasn’t as conscientious as I could have been with my hand sanitizer, I know, but I blame the plane’s low humidity for injuring my nose’s first line of defense.

What do I hate most about plane … Continue reading

Welcome spring (and hay fever)!

I love that first warm touch of spring. But the red, itchy eyes and drippy nose I can do without.

In 2011, the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) reported that 16.9 million adults and 6.7 million children were diagnosed with hay fever. Every year, Americans spend billions of dollars on prescription and over-the-counter allergy medications in the quest for relief.

I suffer from hay fever, too, but I am not a fan of most of the available medications. Prescription drugs are expensive, and require a costly visit to the doctor. Over-the-counter drugs (and there are dozens of them!) are pretty … Continue reading