Make safety a priority this Fourth of July!

fireworks injuriesAny nurse who has worked in an emergency department, especially in a children’s hospital, dreads the Fourth of July.

We’ve seen what fireworks can do to a hand. Or a face. It’s not pretty. (Look on YouTube if you don’t believe me.)

Every state has its own laws on what fireworks are legal. Many cities and communities ban fireworks because of fire danger.

But even legal fireworks are risky and bans don’t necessarily stop people from doing stupid things.

The American Academy of Pediatrics makes this statement on their website:

​The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) continues to urge families

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Stop the Bleeding – First aid tips to control bleeding

stop the bleedingSurgeons want the public to learn this skill

I taught first aid classes for the American Red Cross for many years. To control excessive bleeding, we showed students how to apply pressure directly on a wound, or at pressure points in the groin and upper arm.

We did not teach how to use a tourniquet. The Red Cross deemed this technique to be potentially dangerous and beyond the skill set of most lay responders.

I told this to a surgeon friend once, and he was amazed. He said “The Red Cross needs to get its head into the 21st century.”Continue reading

Choose sunglasses that block UV rays

sunglasses that block uv raysUV rays damage eyes

As part of May’s Skin Cancer Prevention Month, I wanted to share some tips to protect your eyes.

Just as the sun can injure your skin, it can hurt the delicate tissue of your eyes, too.

Did you know you can also get melanoma of the eye? Unprotected UV exposure from the sun or tanning beds increases the risk of this type of cancer.

Related post: Tanning beds and skin cancer

Long-term exposure to UVA and UVB rays contributes to cataracts and age-related macular degeneration.

Cataracts—cloudy areas on your eye’s lens—can be corrected with … Continue reading

Teen athletes, screening ECGs, and AEDs

screening ecgsThe debate over screening ECGs

When my son was a teenager, he participated in several school sports, including track and field.

And it always freaked me out when I heard a news report about a young teen athlete suddenly dying on a track or a basketball court.

The stories were similar: young, seemingly healthy teenagers died because no one knew they had a problem with their hearts.

Every time I wondered if I should immediately take my son to his pediatrician and demand an (electrocardiogram) ECG to make sure his heart was OK.

I had to remind myself that these … Continue reading

Learn CPR and first aid

♥It’s Valentine’s Day!♥ In honor of that I thought I would re-post about learning CPR. It’s a great skill to have! FN

Here’s a feel-good story about a young man who saved a life because he knew how to perform CPR—and wasn’t afraid to use it!

CPR delivered: “I left a pizza boy and came back a pizza man”

CPR is a great skill to know. It’s not going to be useful in every scenario, but just having the knowledge of how to do it can be very empowering in an emergency situation. And many CPR classes also teach you … Continue reading

My favorite healthcare books and gifts for 2016

I’m spending the day online getting some gift shopping done, and I thought I’d post about some of the healthcare books and gifts I’m buying for friends and family this year.

I use Amazon a lot (Prime, so I get free 2-day shipping), and I have to include a disclosure here that the following links will take you to my Amazon Associates page. That said, I’m not trying to make any money with my blog, so if you can find these products for better prices elsewhere, great!

For the sleep deprived

As someone who has battled insomnia most of her … Continue reading

Know CPR? Get the Pulse Point app

Pulse Point saves a life!

A recent news story here in Seattle caught my eye: Off-duty doctor gets Pulse Point app alert, saves man’s life

pulse pointDouglas Stine was driving with co-workers along Aurora Ave. on Monday when he started gasping for air and lost consciousness, the result of a heart condition.

The other workers called 911, but help arrived minutes before the paramedics.

Dr. Matt Gittinger, a UW medicine physician at Harborview, happened to be at his dining room table catching up on work when he saw an alert on his phone.

“I was out of my front door within

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First aid for bee stings

yellow jacketHow do you react?

Bees, wasps, yellow jackets, hornets, and fire ants all belong to the same order of insects, Hymenoptera, so their venoms cause similar reactions if you are stung or bitten.

People’s bodies react in one of three ways:

  1. 85-90% experience a small local reaction—pain, redness and some swelling just around the sting site.
  2. 10% experience what is called a “large local reaction”—pain, itching, redness and swelling extending well beyond the sting site, 4 to 6 inches or more. (This is me! When I was stung in the hand last year, my entire arm swelled up.)
  3. 1-3%
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What is a dry drowning?

Dry drowning and secondary drowning

A few weeks ago I wrote a post about kids and water safety.

I want to add some information about two little known conditions called “dry drowning” and “secondary drowning.” They’re relatively rare, thank goodness, but can happen up to 24 hours following a near-drowning when parents think their child is no longer in danger.

Both a dry drowning and a secondary drowning occur out of the water, after a child inhales some water. He or she might look panicked and cough violently for a short time. Often these kids then feel well … Continue reading

First aid for fireworks injuries

By July 5, most large communities have reported property damage—fires, mostly—and bodily damage—burns, missing fingers, blindness.

As a reminder to everybody to be careful around fireworks—my preference is to avoid them altogether—the San Diego Fire Department put together this great public service video demonstrating the danger of explosives fireworks.

If you want some pretty graphic reasons to stay away from fireworks, just go to YouTube and search for “fireworks injuries.”

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) offers the following tips to keep kids safe:

  • Fireworks can result in severe burns, blindness, scars, and even death.
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Home remedies for sunburns

sunburnsFew summer ailments are as common as sunburns.

Prevention is key, of course, and you can read my previous posts on using sunscreens and how to save money on them.

But if you or your kids get a sunburn, here are some simple steps you can take to stop the burning and promote healing.

You don’t need to buy a bunch of special products. I do keep an inexpensive bottle of aloe vera gel in my medicine cabinet as one of my basic first aid supplies.

Tips to treat sunburns

  • Cool the skin. Whether
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Water safety tips

water safety tipsA preventable tragedy

A children’s hospital in Texas just released a grim statistic for the not-yet-over month of June: 15 near drownings and two drowning deaths of small children.

“Can you imagine being a parent, sitting in the ED waiting room, praying that the life of someone you love so dearly is spared, especially since it was something that didn’t have to happen? No parent wants to be saddled with that guilt.”

Such tragedies aren’t unique to Texas. Near drownings and deaths are reported every spring and summer as the weather heats up, kids get out of school, and families … Continue reading

First aid for heat stroke

first aid for heat strokeHere comes the sun!

Living in the Pacific Northwest,  we rarely have to worry about heat stroke or other heat-related illnesses.

In fact, it so often rains through the Fourth of July, we joke that summer doesn’t officially start until July 5th.

But today and through July 4th a heat advisory will be in effect where I live. We are being warned that not only will temperatures be unusually hot and uncomfortable, they might be deadly for some.

Most at risk are the very young and elderly.

  • Do not leave children of any age (or pets) unattended in parked cars!
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ER tips to keep kids safe at home

As any parent or child caregiver can tell you, keeping kids safe—especially into-everything toddlers—takes a lot of planning ahead. We look around the house or yard and try to think like they do: What will they be attracted to? What will they pick up and put in their mouths? How high can they reach? Etc….

And sometimes we fail.

I just watched two video clips of ER docs talking about some common injuries they see, and what parents can do to make their homes more safe.

The first is from the TV show The Doctors: 3 Dangerous Drugs that Can Continue reading

Use hydrogen peroxide contact solutions with care

peroxiclearI wear contact lenses. Several years ago, when my eyes began to be more dry and easily irritated, my ophthalmologist recommended using the new 3% hydrogen peroxide-based cleaning solution.

The preservatives used in many eye drops and contact lens solutions can be irritating, especially if used over time. Hydrogen peroxide solutions don’t contain these preservatives.

Related post: The eyes have it

I was interested in getting rid of my red eyes, but the thought of using hydrogen peroxide on my eyeballs scared me. I had to have a lot of faith in the science that the little piece of platinum … Continue reading