Good health – No miracle required

nomiracleI laughed the other day when I read a post on the blog Science-Based Medicine. The author denounced the all powerful Dr. Mehmet Oz for his frequent promotion of “miracle” products on his eponymous show, and commented that:

This constant drive for miracles must keep the producers in a perpetual panic. They need at least five miracles per week.

Which episode incited the author’s scorn? “Dr. Oz’s 13 Miracles for 2013.” Wow, that’s a lot of miracles.

Related post from Science-Based Medicine: Dr. Mehmet Oz completes his journey to the Dark Side

Like snake oil salesmen of old, the … Continue reading

Disneyland – The happiest last place on earth

palliative and hospice careDisneyland, here I come!

I have a plan. If I get cancer (or when, because according to news reports just about everything causes cancer eventually) and my doctors have nothing left to offer but last-ditch, statistically-improbable treatments that cost a fortune, I’m saving my money and booking a suite at the Disneyland Hotel.

Last summer I read a blog post titled “How Doctors Die.” The author, a physician, made the simple statement that “Doctors don’t die like the rest of us.” Why? Because “they know enough about modern medicine to know its limits.”

He shares his and other health professionals’ … Continue reading

The CPAP machine – An American success story?

Have you ever heard of a company called ResMed? If you suffer from obstructive sleep apnea and have been prescribed a CPAP (continuous positive airway pressure) machine, you probably have.

Or, if you follow the stock market, you might recognize ResMed as one of its rising stars. Rising because, according to its website, ResMed ‘s revenues and profits have grown every quarter since it was formed in 1989. In 2012, ResMed reported revenues of approximately $1.4 billion.

What is the secret to ResMed’s amazing success? Our country’s poor health.

Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is the common condition in which … Continue reading

First sleep, second sleep

Last week, the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) released a report that 1 in 24 drivers admits to falling asleep while driving, and up to 33% of fatal traffic accidents may involve a drowsy driver.

Although frightening, this statistic is hardly news to those of us, myself included, who suffer from chronic sleeplessness. We can just add “death by fiery car crash” to the ever-expanding list of risks related to sleep deprivation, including obesity, diabetes, heart disease, stroke, dementia and cancer.

Such stories invariably conclude with the advice “health officials recommend getting 7 to 9 hours of sleep each night.”Continue reading

The healing power of mahjongg?

For more than five years, one of my best friends has been battling ovarian cancer. A fierce fighter (and fabulous friend!), she has endured surgeries and several rounds of chemotherapy to keep this grim disease at bay. Her oncologist monitors her condition with the blood test CA-125.

Early last summer, her CA-125 began creeping up into the “let’s watch it but not get too excited—yet” territory. She knew from past experience that she might be facing another round of chemo.

Then we began playing mahjongg. Or, more accurately, American mahjongg, which is a variant of the arcane Chinese game … Continue reading

A picture worth a thousand words

Last week, the publication of three short health care reports caught my eye. Separately, each is a “bad-news-as-usual” snapshot of health concerns; spliced together, however, they create a bigger, grimmer picture of the health and financial future of our country.

First, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reported that between 1995 and 2010, the incidence of adults diagnosed with diabetes has almost doubled.

Part of the rate increase is explained by improved diagnosis and diabetics living longer, but the report’s authors concluded that the “major driver” is that “the increase in diabetes prevalence coincides with the increase in … Continue reading