Surviving the health care jungle

Three years ago, my husband nearly died because of a series of medical mistakes. Although no one was guilty of clear medical malpractice (grossly negligent care resulting in harm), the hospital’s attempts to cut costs, a physician’s careless instructions, and a firewall of inflexible receptionists who refused to let me speak with a doctor led to a 911 call, a trip to the ER, and a 3-day stay in the ICU.

Luckily, he survived. But the resulting medical bills, as you can imagine, were enormous. And completely preventable.

Would it shock you to know that in 1999 the Institute of Continue reading

Equal rights for vision!

For the last 15 years, my family has purchased an individual health insurance policy. Individual plans, as opposed to employer-based insurance, usually don’t cover vision. We could buy a separate vision policy, but in an average year the premiums would cost more than our annual eye exams, glasses and contacts combined.

Even Medicare doesn’t pay for routine eye exams and corrective lenses, except one pair after cataract surgery.

Of course, eye diseases and injuries (your mother always told you not to run with pointy objects, didn’t she?) are covered as medical care.

But I’ve always wondered why screening exams for … Continue reading

Boning up on calcium

Out of sight, out of mind

The other day I was cleaning out a kitchen cupboard and unearthed an economy-sized bottle of calcium tablets. Oops! I should be taking one or two of those every day.

Or should I?

Everyone knows calcium is necessary for bone health. Most women have been told by their doctors that they need extra calcium after menopause because without estrogen’s help, bones do not absorb it well. Low calcium leads to osteoporosis, which leads to broken bones, which lead to huge health care costs. Oh no!

Too much of a good thing—or the wrong thing

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Do you didgeridoo?

didgeridoo playerAs I was skimming through some of my favorite medical blogs the other day, I ran across a post by Dr. Synonymous, a family medicine doctor somewhere in middle America. His post referred to the time and place of his first “Didgeridoo Hullabaloo” session that he was offering for his patients that suffered from snoring and sleep apnea.

What is a didgeridoo? It’s a native Australian wind instrument, which can be up to 10 feet long! It works like a large kazoo, and produces a low, resonant sound something like an elephant.

And how does this help snoring? Snoring and … Continue reading

Got a craving?

In another bit of good news this week, the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) reported that Americans are actually eating less fast food. Since 2006, an American adult’s total daily calories from fast food has dropped from 12.8% to 11.3%.

This number, although small, surprised me. It is no secret that America is in an obesity epidemic; more than one-third of adults meet the definition of obesity with a Body Mass Index (BMI) of 30 or higher. In children, the obesity rate is about 15%.

Obesity is tied to all sorts of chronic health problems such as heart disease, … Continue reading

The eyes have it

Do you suffer from chronically dry, red, itchy eyes? The eye drops you use might actually be making your eyes look and feel worse.

Like so many over-the-counter (OTC) products, there are dozens of eye drops from which to choose. How do you know which is best?

As always, ignore the front of the package and read the ingredients.

Oxymetazoline HCl and naphazoline HCl are decongestants. Drops that advertise “decreased redness”, such as Visine, contain a decongestant that constricts the small blood vessels in the eye. It works temporarily, but has a “rebound” effect; that is, the redness gets worse … Continue reading

How to use a neti pot

Wash your nose?

I wrote in a previous post that frequent hand washing is your best defense against a cold virus; but what about washing your nose? The inside of your nose, to be exact.

You just need a neti pot.

The neti pot is an inexpensive device for saline nasal irrigation, which is a fancy term for nose washing.

It’s easy!

How do I use a neti pot? It’s very simple. I fill the pot—which resembles a small tea pot or Aladdin’s lamp—with warm saline (salt) solution. Leaning over a sink, I place the spout in one nostril and … Continue reading

Flu update

It appears that the 2012-13 flu season is especially severe and has not yet reached its peak, which is when the maximum number of cases have been reported and we start to see a downward trend.

In early November, I posted about the advantages, health-wise and financial, of getting a flu shot.

It’s still not too late, and there is ample vaccine available.

FYI, it takes about two weeks for the vaccine to reach its full effectiveness.

FN

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Save money – vitamin C vs. zinc

Vitamin C…

It’s cold season and products that claim to prevent or significantly shorten colds are flying off the drugstore shelves.

As I emphasized in an earlier post, frequent hand washing is your best strategy to avoid a cold altogether.

Still, the advertisements for such products are both pervasive and persuasive  But are they worth buying?

Vitamin C (1000mg) is the major ingredient of Airborne and Emergen-C. Both are made into fizzy drinks. Airborne also claims to have a “proprietary blend” of minerals and herbs, but it’s really about the vitamin C. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) will not … Continue reading

It’s not too late to get a flu shot!

A leading health headline today indicates that the 2012-13 flu season is off to an early and strong start.

Flu cases always peak at some point during the season, usually in January or February, but sometimes as late as March and sometimes, apparently like this year, as early as November.

However, it’s not too late to get your flu shot. Despite the early start, flu season will continue into March and April.

Also, this year’s vaccine is well-matched to the reported influenza virus, which means the vaccine is even more likely to protect you.

FN

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Hand washing 101

Germs are everywhere

Being frugal, I live by the saying that an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.

One of the best ways to prevent nasty seasonal colds and flu (not to mention nasty intestinal ailments) is to wash your hands.

It doesn’t take much imagination to envision the gazillions of germs that are lurking on handles and door knobs and other surfaces that we—and others—touch multiple times a day.

Wash your hands often

Soap and water are the gold standards of cleanliness, but hand sanitizer has become increasingly popular over the last ten years.

I prefer … Continue reading

Don’t be driftwood!

Get a Flu Shot

With the continuous remodeling of healthcare and health insurance, it seems as if there is little I can do other than ride the waves of change like so much flotsam and jetsam.

But I don’t want to be beach debris. I want a more active role in my health care and that is why I get a flu shot every fall and insist that my family members do, too.

Vaccination against the seasonal flu—inexpensive, safe and effective

Starting as early as September, flu shots are available almost everywhere. You do not even need a doctor’s appointment; … Continue reading